Uploaded on Oct 4, 2010
“David Harvey, distinguished professor of geography, department of anthropology, Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

(Feb 1, 2007 at Dickinson College, sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues)

Critical social theorist David Harvey, distinguished professor of geography at the department of anthropology at the Graduate Center of City University of New York, hosts a discussion at the event, called “The Neoliberal City.” He traces the history of neoliberalism — the view that individual freedom can best be protected through an institutional structure of free markets and free trade — focusing on the New York City fiscal crisis of the 1970s.

Harvey, a leading academic geographer, is author of numerous books, including “A Brief History of Neoliberalism,” which provides examples of divergent practices of neoliberalism since the mid 1970s, and “The Condition of Postmodernity,” which the London Independent newspaper described as one of the 50 most important works of non-fiction published since 1945. Other books include “The New Imperialism,” “Paris, Capital of Modernity,” “Social Justice and the City,” and “Spaces of Hope.”

Harvey, one of the most influential scholars of post-war culture in advanced capitalist societies, has written on globalization, social justice, urban sustainability, the importance of space and place, environmental transformation, and the new imperialism.

Harvey, who earned his Ph.D. from Cambridge University, formerly was professor of Geology at Johns Hopkins University, a Miliband Fellow at the London School of Economics, and Halford Mackinder professor of Geology at Oxford.

He has received the Outstanding Contributor Award of the Association of American Geographers; the Anders Retzius Gold Medal of the Swedish Society of Anthropology and Geography; and the 2002 Centenary Medal of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society. He holds honorary doctorates from the universities of Buenos Aires, Roskilde in Denmark, Uppsala in Sweden, and Ohio State University”

An outstanding example of an ‘artistic’ intervention, in which Watts confronts the technocrat poptech audience with itself, giving all of us a lesson in how to create spaces for critique and communication, or expression and diplomacy. By blurring the boundaries of science and art, he unravels the implicit cultural and therefore political continuities (and absurdities) of ‘universal’ modern science.

Pick your favorite quote and share it in the comment section!

Maria Lugones

January 31, 2013

Reboot.fm: Love & Chaos #9

November 28, 2012

a sand-corn of gold in the desert

Download

http://reboot.fm/2012/09/16/love-chaos-9-where-are-you-from/

De Nederlandse Klimaatbeweging

Wij zijn niet te stoppen, klimaatverandering wel!

Bijvoet Tegemoet

Natuur en plant in Nederland

Bladvormen

een sub-site van Les Simons

somaexperiments

Just another WordPress.com site

CircleEcology

Voedselbossen en agroecologie

Conferințele de Vară de la Telciu

Telciu Summer Conferences

Freestate SWOMP

Rustenburgerstraat 438 - 440, Amsterdam

Longreads

The best longform stories on the web

The Applied Ecologist's blog

Bridging the gap between researchers, and practitioners, and policymakers

Duurzame Pleinen

Werken aan eerlijke en groene pleinen

Human Rights Online Philippines

Promotion and Protection of Human Rights in the Philippines through Information Resources Online

The Feminist Rag

Surfing the Feminist Ocean & Decolonizing its Waves

Appalachian Center for Agroforestry

Rewilding permaculture one homestead at a time

the thai chronicles

You my friend are still so young: or what I learned after graduation

Onderweg

Ago quod agis

rock roads

Every road leads to rock

Synchronicity and Subculture

Musings, meanderings and mischief by Cyrus 'Sirius' Bozorgmehr