Published on Sep 28, 2012
Boaventura de Sousa Santos Lecture at University Wisconsin-Madison, 1 November 2011.

The exhaustion of eurocentrism, social regulation and social emancipation, and the ‘absence’ of real alternatives.

Uploaded on Oct 4, 2010
“David Harvey, distinguished professor of geography, department of anthropology, Graduate Center of the City University of New York.

(Feb 1, 2007 at Dickinson College, sponsored by the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues)

Critical social theorist David Harvey, distinguished professor of geography at the department of anthropology at the Graduate Center of City University of New York, hosts a discussion at the event, called “The Neoliberal City.” He traces the history of neoliberalism — the view that individual freedom can best be protected through an institutional structure of free markets and free trade — focusing on the New York City fiscal crisis of the 1970s.

Harvey, a leading academic geographer, is author of numerous books, including “A Brief History of Neoliberalism,” which provides examples of divergent practices of neoliberalism since the mid 1970s, and “The Condition of Postmodernity,” which the London Independent newspaper described as one of the 50 most important works of non-fiction published since 1945. Other books include “The New Imperialism,” “Paris, Capital of Modernity,” “Social Justice and the City,” and “Spaces of Hope.”

Harvey, one of the most influential scholars of post-war culture in advanced capitalist societies, has written on globalization, social justice, urban sustainability, the importance of space and place, environmental transformation, and the new imperialism.

Harvey, who earned his Ph.D. from Cambridge University, formerly was professor of Geology at Johns Hopkins University, a Miliband Fellow at the London School of Economics, and Halford Mackinder professor of Geology at Oxford.

He has received the Outstanding Contributor Award of the Association of American Geographers; the Anders Retzius Gold Medal of the Swedish Society of Anthropology and Geography; and the 2002 Centenary Medal of the Royal Scottish Geographical Society. He holds honorary doctorates from the universities of Buenos Aires, Roskilde in Denmark, Uppsala in Sweden, and Ohio State University”

Picture 7

“Slavery remains as the most telling event and process in the formation of Western Civilization and the modern/colonial world in the Atlantic, from the XVI to early XIX centuries. An aberration upon which Western modernity built its economic foundations at the same time that managed to “normalize” the dispensability of human lives. Dispensable where lives of people considered lesser human and subjected to be enslaved and dispensed with when they were no longer necessary. Slavery was not only a set of processes and events. It was, above all, the consequence of a frame of knowledge that established a hierarchy of human beings. That frame of knowledge was and is what today we know as “racism.” Slavery was deeply rooted in epistemic un-justice.

The fourth edition of the Middelburg Decolonial Summer School focus on ” Slavery: The Past and Present of Social (Un) Justice.” It is designed to investigate the logic and presupposition of Global Un-justice in the modern/colonial world, from 1500 to 2000. The seminar takes place in Middelburg, a key city of the Dutch slave trade and it is set against the backdrop of the 150 anniversary of the abolition of slavery in The Netherlands.

The ‘Decolonial Option’ aims to open new perspectives for understanding global (un) justice as well as to overcome them in the process of imagining and building just and convivial futures. If coloniality, as unfolded in the collective project “modernity/coloniality”, is the logic behind social un-justices, it remains hidden under the rhetoric of modernity, Decoloniality shall be—therefore—the process of disclosing and undoing coloniality to promote and contribute to enact social justice. Global un-justices operates at all levels of the socio-economic and cultural spectrum, from economy to politics, from religion to aesthetics, from gender and sexuality to ethnicity and racism, and above all, in the control of knowledge.

The Decolonial Summer Seminar will take advantage of what Middleburg has to offer to understand the history of slavery and its connection to the formation of Western power. Building on the local history of Middelburg, we will theoretically explore the nature and consequences of slavery and we will draw the continuities between the colonial past and current forms of social un-justice around the world. We will pay special attention to emerging project, parallel to the project modernity/coloniality/decoloniality who are working toward overcoming the legacies of the South-North divide. If the colonial matrix of power encompasses several domains (economy, politics, gender, cosmology, aesthetics, racialization), the task of overcoming coloniality requires of many people in many areas of knowing and doing. Activists, artists, scholars, journalists will, among others, contribute to the goals of the 4th edition of the Decolonial Summer School at Middleburg.”

http://www.utrechtsummerschool.nl/index.php?type=courses&code=S21

 

bebop-2013-flyer

“After its outstanding debut last year, this new edition of the series BLACK EUROPE BODY POLITICS is expanding with live performances and an all-day screening commemorating Malcolm X´s birthday at the Hackesche Höfe Kino, in cooperation with AfricAvenir.

DECOLONIZING THE “COLD” WAR is the first Afropean performance showcase and will be accompanied by roundtable discussions on the aesthetic legacy of the Black Power movement in the radical imagination of Diaspora artists. Parallel to this, its influence in liberation and decolonization struggles in the Global South during the so-called “Cold” War will be approached from the continuities of coloniality. According to Enrique Dussel, a liberation philosopher and decolonial thinker, this war was never “cold” in the Global South.

We are witnessing a kind of global revivalism on documentary material on the Black Power movement (a good example is the release (2011) of Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975, by Göran Olsson) and dozens of seminars and conferences are mushrooming all over Europe on the so called “Cold” War. In these hegemonic narratives the global South is usually considered as a mere recipient of Western imperialism.

During this festival, the story will be told from the perspective of the self-affirmation of Black Power. The emblematic figure of Angela Davis created a planetary movement of solidarity that went beyond the term “Black Internationalism”. These narratives of re-existence will be analyzed in relation to Frantz Fanon´s fundamental role in global South liberation struggles during that period. His interactions with Jean-Paul Sartre will be the focus of some of these unprecedented debates. The worldwide solidarities resulting from the Black Power movement united people beyond racialization and political agendas. BE.BOP 2013 celebrates a paradigm shift that transformed the Black Body into a source of inspiration and beauty prevalent until today.

The festival takes place in English.”

http://decolonizingthecoldwar.wordpress.com/2013/03/26/program/

ROUNDTABLE pre-registration: http://decolonizingthecoldwar.eventbrite.com/

Hope from the margins – By Gustavo Esteva

These notes offer a quick glance to ways, in the south of Mexico, in which people are regenerating the society from the bottom up. It is a new kind of revolution without leaders or vanguards, which goes beyond development and globalization. It is about displacing the economy from the center of social life, reclaiming a communal way of being, encouraging radical pluralism, and advancing towards real democracy.

the oaxaca commune

From June to October 2006, there were no police in the city of Oaxaca (population 600,000), not even to direct traffic. The governor and his functionaries met secretly in hotels or private homes; none of them dared to show up at their offices. The Popular Assembly of the Peoples of Oaxaca (APPO) had posted 24-hour guards in all the public buildings, radio and TV stations. When the governor launched nocturnal attacks against these guards, the people responded by putting up barricades.

Some observers began speaking of the Oaxaca Commune, evoking the Paris Commune of 1871. The analogy is pertinent but exaggerated, except for the reaction these two popular insurrections elicited in the centers of power. Like the European armies that crushed the communards, the Federal Police of Mexico, backed by the army and the navy, conducted a terrible repression on November 25, 2006. They could not use the ways of the 19th century, but they inflicted a massive violation of human rights using an approach that can legitimately be described as state terrorism.

 

“Since November 13, 2003 when President Hugo Chavez, speaking at El Menito, Lagunillas, announced the increase in carbon exploitation to 36 million metric tons per year in the territories inhabited by different native ethnic groups, Sabino Romero was one of the people from indigenous communities that mobilized to protest the consequences their land would suffer due to the expansion of mega-mining in their region.

[…]
Sabino’s struggle was against the developmental model based on the extraction and commercialization of oil, gas and minerals for the world market, a role assigned to Venezuela by the economic globalization. The deepening of the state’s oil capitalism hides its consequences to the environment and the peasant and indigenous communities.

[…]
Sabino joins the roster of fighters assassinated during the Bolivarian government for defending their rights, together with Mijail Martinez, Luis Hernandez, Richard Gallardo and Carlos Requena. The only polarization we anarchists recognize is that between governors and governed, between the powerful and the weak, between bosses and workers, in general, between victims and perpetrators. Therefore we will ask nothing of the perpetrators, we expect nothing from their fake justice or the crocodile tears of the bureaucrats who empowered Sabino’s execution. Like yesterday, today and tomorrow, we will continue to mobilize with all those who struggle against the power..”

Earth First! Newswire

Venezuela: the killing of Sabino Romero

The following is from a statement by the El Libertario Collective following the murder of Sabino Romero, Yukpa indigenous rights activist, in Zulia, Venezuela last night:

During the night of March 3, 2013 Yukpa Cacique Sabino Romero, well known for his defense of the rights of the Yukpa people, was assassinated on Chaktapa Highway, in the Sierra de Perijá (Zulia State). Since November 13, 2003 when President Hugo Chavez, speaking at El Menito, Lagunillas, announced the increase in carbon exploitation to 36 million metric tons per year in the territories inhabited by different native ethnic groups, Sabino Romero was one of the people from indigenous communities that mobilized to protest the consequences their land would suffer due to the expansion of mega-mining in their region. Sabino’s struggle focused on obtaining the zoning and title to the indigenous territories, for which he put together different mobilizations in Zulia State as well…

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Maria Lugones

January 31, 2013

never, NEVER forget the history of coloniality. It will be remembered as the beginning of the end by those who know what is currently happening. The Anthropogenic extinction

“Patrick Bond: Platinum miners strike inspires workers across South Africa; Billionaire mine owner becomes deputy head of ANC
Watch full multipart Platinum Miners and Class Struggle in South Africa

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